Bootliner

How taking care of sporting equipment can save more than money

High-adrenaline extreme sports are increasingly popular here in the UK, with more and more people heading out to the back of beyond to leap, climb, scale and ride and ultimately push themselves to the absolute limit.

As any fully-fledged boy scout will tell you, the first rule of hitting the great outdoors is to be prepared, so taking time to seek out the right training and source the correct specialist gear is essential. Investing in high-quality equipment will undoubtedly help improve performance and keep you safe, but it’s not going to do its job if you don’t take proper care of it.

Cleaning, maintaining and safely storing equipment between uses is far less exciting than using it to scale a vertical rock face, but it will help prolong its life—not to mention yours! There’s no point buying top-of-the-range equipment if you’re going to just dump it in the back of your car, so it’s well worth investing in protective storage for transporting it. Wipe-clean bootliners will stop equipment from rattling around in transit and help prevent unnecessary damage—to both the gear itself and your car.

To learn more about why looking after specialist sports equipment is important, we spoke to Richard Goodey, co-founder of Lost Earth Adventures. As a qualified rock-climbing instructor, Mountain Leader, Level 2 Caving Leader and mountain bike instructor, Richard knows a thing or two about extreme sports. He’s also wilderness first-aid trained, a white‑water rescue specialist and has a Recreational Avalanche Certification—making him the perfect person to talk to about equipment safety.

Here’s what he had to say:

How important is it to keep specialist equipment in good condition?

Richard: People rely on us to guide them and keep them safe, whether we’re mountaineering, caving, canyoning or mountain biking in the UK and the highest mountain ranges on earth. Nothing is worse than a crampon slipping off when climbing a steep ice face, leaving you to precariously climb hundreds of metres one-footed, or your brakes failing while descending the longest mountain bike descent on earth at high speed above a cliff! Both of these problems could be fatal so spending a lot of money and time getting the right kit, maintaining it and educating yourself about it is incredibly important.

Obviously not all cheap kit will kill you and budget is always something to take into account, but it is important to get your priorities right with adventure sports and make sure you have efficient, professional and top-quality gear. Most adventurers have spent long, cold nights in sub-par waterproofs in a downpour or had shoulder straps break on their rucksacks with 10 miles still to hike at the end of a long day. You don’t need money to be an adventurer but if you want to push limits or give people a successful and enjoyable time in the mountains, you need to make sure everything is A-OK.

Do you have any tips for preventing equipment from becoming damaged in transit?

Richard: Keep it away from battery acid and other chemicals. Most kit gets thrown in the boot of a car then taken back to a storage unit or an instructor’s house for cleaning. This would normally be stored in duffel bags to protect it against any foreign liquids or sharp or moving parts.

Old head-torch batteries should be kept separate from any fabric equipment or ropes as battery acid destroys rope by making it brittle. The worse part is you might not notice the battery acid has affected the rope until it’s too late. Always check ropes before every use and treat strange stains with caution as chemicals can cause rope to degrade.

Apart from that, just keep your kit away from anything that isn’t mud, rocks or water. Outdoor kit is designed to be wet and muddy and if it isn’t constantly then you should get out more!

Once you’ve committed to a particular sport, should you buy or hire equipment? What are the pros and cons of each?

Richard: If I’m committed to something and keen to progress in the sport and spend regular time on it, I would always buy my own kit. Rental gear is usually heavy, doesn’t fit quite right and isn’t that glamorous. However, I regularly rent mountain bikes because if I’m away for a few days I don’t want to leave an expensive bike in the boot of my car.

Sometimes it’s better to split costs with friends if on a budget—for example, you can buy the climbing rack and your mate buys the rope. You can always do things on the cheap—climbers are known for that! If you’re going to be climbing on a shoestring, spend all your money on climbing gear and sleep in your car to save on accommodation costs—it’s about prioritising the right things.

Does equipment you hire out often come back damaged?

Richard: Yes, people never treat rental kit like their own. What’s that mountain biker's expression? Ride it like you rented it!

What’s the main cause of equipment getting damaged or broken, whether while it’s being used or through improper maintenance/storage?

Richard: Our main issues are excessively worn ropes, broken headlamps and damaged mountain bikes. The ropes get worn quickly due to people not being as careful as if they were their own. Rushed set-ups and not taking care on rough rock means ropes wear out more quickly—you can buy padding to put round ropes on rough rock. Headlamps are delicate and people are heavy-handed with them and don’t shut the battery door properly so water gets in.

Often big groups on some kind of celebratory adventure go hell for leather and they fall off and break parts (and themselves). Most other outdoor kit is pretty hardy though so we don’t have many other issues.

What measures can people take to ensure their specialist equipment lasts as long as possible?

Richard: Clean it after every use, wash grit out of it and store it in a dry, well-ventilated place out of harmful UV rays from the sun.

How often should you expect to replace equipment such as ropes, harnesses and clips?

Richard: Ropes and harnesses can last up to 10 years if stored properly and barely used but somebody climbing twice a month would normally get three years’ usage. We replace our ropes every year if they are out several times a week. Metalwork will be good for 10 years normally but you should always check the manufacturer’s recommendations as every manufacturer is different and by law will have recommendations on when to replace after different amounts of use.

Many people share Richard’s passion for the great outdoors—although not always to such an extreme! But whether you’re more suited to a gentle stroll through the countryside or a full-on white-knuckle experience, the principles remain the same—look after your equipment and it will look after you.

Get ready, set and go — Your complete checklist for the ultimate road trip

As John Steinbeck famously said ‘people don’t take trips, trips take people’ which is just one of the many reasons why the lure of the open road appeals to so many holiday makers. Taking a road trip is a great way to experience every aspect of your holiday, and making the most of the journey — rather than focussing purely on the destination — means that your adventure starts the very moment you put your foot on the pedal.

As with all types of holiday, a little bit of pre-planning can make a huge difference to the ease and enjoyment of your trip. This handy road-trip checklist will help ensure that your trip goes as smoothly as possible…

Get roadworthy

When it comes to road trips, the difference between the trip of a lifetime and the holiday from hell depends largely on the condition of your vehicle. Giving your vehicle a bit of TLC before hitting the road can help prevent any nasty surprises.

☐   Check that all vehicle documents are up to date. Ensure that your road tax, insurance and MOT are valid and will not expire while you are away.

☐   Book your vehicle in for a service. Don’t chance it that you will get a last-minute appointment, reputable garages are often booked up in advance.

☐   Roadside assistance. This could turn out to be invaluable if you break down in the middle of nowhere. It is often inexpensive and the cost is far outweighed by the peace of mind it offers.

☐   Consider hiring a car. Especially useful if your car is prone to being unreliable. If you have problems with it at home it is highly likely that it is not going to last the length of your trip.

☐   Prior to leaving, double-check the following:

☐   Tyre pressure

☐   Windscreen wash

☐   Engine oil

☐   Petrol

Plan your route

Getting lost can sometimes lead to the best road trip adventures, ‘sometimes’ being the operative word. Knowing where you are going and how to get there will eliminate stress and most certainly reduce the chance of navigational disputes!

☐   A recently updated Sat-Nav can be a godsend when travelling through unfamiliar areas.

☐   A trusty map is worth its weight in gold if you lose GPS signal, or if you want an overview of the wider area.

☐   Plan your route via the scenic route. Detouring from the motorways can open up some stunning scenery and views.

☐   Research guest houses, hostels and camp sites along your route in case your plans have to change for any reason.

Pack smartly

How much you pack depends on three elements: how long you are going for, the size of your car and the number of passengers. Packing everything you need while maintaining passenger comfort can be a tricky balance to strike, but the right equipment can definitely help.

☐   A roof box will free up space inside the car and is perfect for storing lightweight yet bulky essentials such as sleeping bags, camping chairs and clothing. It is worth noting cars become considerably less aerodynamic when fitted with a roof box, which may negatively affect petrol consumption.

☐   A protective boot liner fitted to the exact dimensions of your car boot will help prevent the car’s interior from being damaged when packing and unpacking bulky luggage. It will also protect the boot from the mud, sand and wet that inevitably gets transferred into the car whilst out and about.

☐   Pack smartly and make sure that your actual bags and cases aren’t adding on unnecessary bulk to your luggage. Handles and wheels can take up valuable space so think about lightweight alternatives, especially if your luggage is staying in the car or going straight from the boot to your accommodation. Consider using laundry bags for clothing. Stackable, clear plastic boxes are also great for organising general belongings, especially when camping.

In case of emergency

It’s always worth preparing for all eventualities so keep a box of emergency essentials tucked away. If possible, include:

☐   Emergency breakdown triangle

☐   Hi-vis vests

☐   Torch (with working batteries)

☐   Spare tyre/puncture kit

☐   Water and snacks reserved for emergency use

Get comfortable

Sitting in the same position for hours on end can become uncomfortable, so it is important to make regular stops to visit the loo and stretch your legs. Maximising in-car comfort will help make long stretches of the journey more bearable.

☐   Lightweight blankets can make driving at night cosier for passengers and will reduce the need to crank up the heating — which can cause tiredness due to dry eyes, not to mention burn more fuel.

☐   Supportive neck pillows can help passengers catch forty winks while in transit.

☐   Sharing the drive will undoubtedly ensure that all parties enjoy the journey. Make sure all drivers are insured on the vehicle prior to departing.

☐   Do not underestimate the power of snacks. Stock up on snacks that are easy to munch on the go, plus water bottles to keep you hydrated. Insulated flasks are great for keeping hot drinks warm, and they can be re-filled at service stations throughout the journey.

☐   In-car entertainment such as portable DVD players, tablets, guessing games and a few good playlists will help while away less scenic stretches of the trip, especially if you are travelling with children.

…and hit the road

A bit of smart planning can make a huge difference to the success of your trip and ensure that the journey is every bit as fun as the destination. So get prepared, get packed, get comfortable and get going!

Take a look at our Skoda accessories for both the Karoq and Kodiaq

You can keep your car boot staying in style with our Skoda accessories

The perfect mat for your Skoda

Our boot liners are not only handy to have after beach walks with the dog, but also following a hike. Here at Hatchbag we offer the perfect Skoda accessories to give you the full protection for your boot. Plus, at the same time offering a comfortable place for your dog to ride in.

Control the odours in your Skoda car boot

Skoda accessories - Odour Control pet mat We offer an array of Skoda accessories for your Skoda Karoq and Kodiaq. Not only do we offer a boot liner for each model but also the choice of one of three mats for both you and your pooch. One of our mats we offer is the very special odour mat. After-all, as much as we love our dogs they do get very dirty and smelly after all the fun activities. So, with this in mind, we have developed a quilted blanket style mat which contains activated carbon to absorb and eliminate bad odours. These are tailored to fit inside a Hatchbag Boot Liner. Plus, the Odour Control Pet Mat has a special finish to repel hair and dirt.

Give your pooch some comfort with one of our Skoda Hatchbed Mats

Skoda accessories - Hatchbed Mat The second mat we offer is the Hatchbed Mat, which comes in pairs. This way whenever one is in the wash (washing machine and tumble drier suitable) you have a spare one ready to go in the boot. The second great feature is the top section is about 25 mm deep of carpet - very comfortable for your pooch! These mats are designed and tailored to fit inside your boot liner and come with a unique non- slip rubber backing. Plus, our Hatchbed Mat is recommended by Vets and Pet Care Professionals.

Protect your Skoda Karoq and Kodiaq car boot from heavy loads

Skoda accessories - Rubber Mat Last but not least is the Rubber mat. This one is very handy for customers who use their boot for heavy use such as, carrying tools or heavy loads. The mat allows objects to move across the surface without ‘’snugging.’’ Thhe mat is also anti-slip, so will prevent both the mat and objects from sliding all over the place.

No need to fluff up the carpet

For the Skoda Karoq and Kodiaq we offer a Frequent Use Tabs kit, available on our skoda accessories page. These tabs act as a sandwich between the liner and the carpet, to prevent the carpet from fluffing up. Each kit comes with thirty-two tabs, so you have more than enough to protect your car boot's carpet.

Skoda accessories for you

When it comes to these two models, there are a number of car boot floor variations on offer. For the Skoda Karoq, we offer one floor version and for the Skoda Kodiaq, we currently offer a liner for both the 7 seater and 5 seater version and for the latter we offer two but soon to be three floor versions. Make sure you check out each boot liner page to see if we offer the version for your vehicle. However, if we don’t then make sure you contact us, as you never know the version your after may be the next one we do.

Bad weather ‘most stressful part of UK car holidays’

Over a third of Britons find the poor weather in this country the most stressful part of driving to UK holiday destinations, research shows.

A survey carried out by boot liner manufacturer Hatchbag asked members of the public ‘What is the most stressful thing about driving around the UK on holiday?’.

More than a third (34.4%) named ‘bad weather’ as the most stressful element of holiday trips around the UK.

Despite the unpredictable UK weather patterns, the popularity of ‘staycations’ has rocketed among Britons in recent years. Research carried out by travel marketing group Sojern shows that last summer saw a 23.8% rise in UK holiday bookings compared with the same period the previous year.

Claudia Finamore, the commercial manager at Hatchbag, said: “More and more Britons are choosing to holiday in the UK – regardless of the weather – making the most of the stunning scenery and coastline that the country has to offer and increasingly embracing the great outdoors. And why wouldn’t they, Britain has some of the most beautiful landscapes found anywhere in the world.”

Camping, glamping, and idyllic forest-style retreats have put a new spin on domestic tourism. Increasing numbers of Britons are turning to the less expensive — and environmentally friendly — UK-based option and away from the hassle and inflated costs associated with holidaying abroad.

The shift has led to a significant boost in the UK tourist industry, with market analysts Mintel predicting that the caravanning and camping market will be worth £3.2 billion by 2020.

Another issue associated with UK holiday road trips was ‘space management’, with one in five people admitting to finding packing and unpacking the car vexing.

This was particularly true among 25 to 44 year olds — the demographic most likely to be holidaying with children.

In fact, cramped conditions and mess created by mud and sand brought into a vehicle were cited by 17.9%  as a point of stress.

Claudia explains: “Unfortunately the car journeys to and from British holiday destinations can be stressful, particularly for young families who are likely to fill every bit of space in the car with holiday necessities.

“One way to help make car journeys more pleasant is to fit a wipe clean, protective bootliner into the car. Aside from reducing the amount of mess that is brought into the car, bootliners also help simplify packing and unpacking luggage and equipment. Bespoke configurations also allow flexibility with different seating configurations, ultimately increasing passenger comfort on the journey.”

According to Tourism Alliance statistics for 2017, almost 20 million UK sightseeing trips were taken by car.

Is your lifestyle reducing the future value of your car?

As the costs of motoring increase, fewer people are now in a position to buy a new or nearly new car outright. Instead, many motorists choose to opt for the tempting Personal Contract Purchase (PCP) deals offered by car manufacturers.

Unlike a hire-purchase agreement — where the customer owns the car once payments are complete — PCP allows motorists to pay lower monthly instalments over a shorter period of time. Then, at the end of the contract, they can simply hand the car back to the dealer and swap the expired deal for a fresh one on another new car, or purchase the car at its agreed Guaranteed Minimum Future Value (GMFV), which is specified in the initial contract.

As with all seemingly ‘win-win’ situations, there is a catch. Namely, how guaranteed this future value price actually is. Because it has been known for motorists to be financially penalised if their lifestyle subjects the vehicle to more wear and tear than the T&Cs allow.

To find out more about what motorists assume will affect the GMFV price on their car, boot-liner manufacturer Hatchbag ran a survey asking the UK public “What parts of a car do you think are likely to cost you money at the end of a lease?”  

Here’s what the survey revealed:

The results

As expected, motorists were most worried that damage to the bodywork would affect the GMFV when they returned the car to the dealer. Bumper scuffs, interior and window damage were also cited as being potential costs.

Surprisingly, the area that attracted the least amount of consideration was interior boot trim — the area of a vehicle that arguably receives the highest amount of daily wear and tear. With only 14.7% of respondents expressing concern, it highlights that the remaining 85.3% are at risk of facing financial penalties due to the state of their car boot.

Why is the boot such a key area for damage?

The primary purpose of the car boot is to transport larger bulky items, such as luggage, pushchairs or sports equipment. The very nature of these items means that they’re likely to rattle around in transit, potentially knocking or scraping against the interior of the boot and tailgate, not to mention the potential damage to the bumper that could be caused getting them into the boot in the first place.

The boot is also used to store items that might otherwise permanently stain the upholstery in the main seating area of the vehicle — such as muddy boots, wet coats and bags of food shopping— despite the fact that these items are equally likely to soil the interior of the boot. This also presents the additional risk of mould spores that become ground in to the boot lining if wet items aren’t removed immediately.

Boot damage can be a problem in any leased car; however, it is more of a risk in cars belonging to young families, pet owners and sport lovers.  Here’s why…

Families

More often than not, the primary requirement for a family car is size. It’s not rocket science to discover that larger cars generally come with a larger price tag, making families the ideal candidates to opt for a budget friendly PCP option.

Unfortunately, young families are also the sector who are most likely to subject their car to an excessive amount of wear and tear — possibly jeopardising their chance of receiving the car’s full ‘future value’.

This is because the car is often used for the following purposes:

Family holidays – A time when the boot is invaluable for storing lots of luggage and possibly camping and outdoor equipment. Factor in sandy buckets and spades, deckchairs, wind breaks, muddy tents, dirty walking boots and the obligatory wet swimwear and towels, and you have a boot full of items that are likely to deposit dirt, sand and water. There is also the added risk that a boot packed with assorted holiday items could scrape the interior walls and tailgate.

Kiddy gear – Young children notoriously come with a lot of equipment, from every-day items such as prams and strollers to activity equipment like bikes, scooters, roller skates and football kits. All of this gear has one thing in common – dirt, be it mud, grease or oil.

Shopping - Although this isn’t a problem exclusive to families, multiple shopping bags accelerate the risk of delicate items becoming damaged in transit and subsequently spilling out of their packaging. A leaked bottle of olive oil, juice, tomato sauce or red wine can wreak havoc on the boot interior, which no amount of scrubbing can completely remove.

Dog owners

Cars with larger boot spaces are also popular with dog owners, and are often used to transport dogs to and from muddy countryside walks. Inevitably, pet hair and mud will quickly become ingrained in the fabric lining of the boot, something that is difficult to prevent even with the use of dog cushions and blankets.

There is also the consideration that pets may become travel sick or have an ‘accident’ in transit. These stains — and their subsequent odours — can be particularly difficult to completely remove from a fabric boot lining. Some dogs also like to chew or scratch at the boot interior, causing irreparable damage.

Sport lovers

Larger cars aren’t exclusive to those who need to transport additional people or pets; sports lovers often opt for a car with lots of boot space to carry their equipment back and forth. It’s not unusual for boots of the neatest looking cars to be filled with golf clubs, fishing equipment, mountain biking and climbing gear, alongside football and general gym wear. Again, many of these items can create muddy or oily stains, plus scratch and scrape against the boot interior and possibly even rip the fabric lining.

Damage limitation

As there is such a grey area around what counts as ‘normal’ wear and tear on a vehicle, it pays to take precaution and protect your car from any potential damage where possible. External scratches to bodywork are often unavoidable; thankfully it is much easier to prevent internal damage. 

It is relatively easy to valet the front and back seats and footwells as you go to prevent stains appearing; with boot space it is generally better to take a ‘prevention is better than cure’ approach.

One great way of ensuring that your boot is not subjected to damage is to fit a boot liner. Rather than throwing down a protective sheet — which is likely to bunch up or slip around, leaving areas of the boot lining unprotected — it is possible to purchase a wipe clean, padded boot liner designed specifically to fit the exact measurements of the make and model of your car. This secure fit means that every inch of the boot lining is protected from any potential damage.

By protecting the boot lining — and inside tailgate if necessary — there is no need to worry about how your lifestyle may be affecting the future value of your car. Instead, you can maximise those family outings, muddy walks and outdoor activities — the very reasons why you may have chosen that particular car in the first place.

Keep your Toyota Rav 4 Hybrid permanently tidy with our Hatchbag boot-liner

Toyota are well-known for their hybrid cars with the Toyota Rav 4 being the latest model to join the Toyota hybrid family. The latest Rav 4 model is bigger than all its earlier models and is an easy-to-drive and comfortable car. The Rav 4 cars are the perfect vehicle for packing up the whole family for an outdoor adventure. Plus, there's enough space in the boot for your furry friends to make themselves comfortable for the drive. And, with the added hybrid version joining the latest Rav 4 family, we have been busy bees in Hatchbag HQ coming up with the perfect accessory for your Toyota Rav 4 Hybrid boot; our very own tailor-made boot liner. There are some slight differences between the hybrid and normal Rav 4 boot, which is why we have come up with a fresh design for the hybrid version. But, as with the original Rav 4 boot, the hybrid version is available in 7 colours, as well as a bunch of optional extras such as, bumper flap, rear seat flap and tailgate cover. So, without further ado, customise your boot-liner today here. Don’t forget to take some pics of your hybrid boot liner on the road, as we just love seeing our products especially if there is a pooch on board. You can send them to us on Twitter @thehatchbagcompany, or on Instagram @thehatchbagcompany or via Facebook.

One liner for two cars – the all new Seat Alhambra & Volkswagen Sharan boot liner is now available

We are proud to present one liner that fits two cars: The Volkswagen Sharan and sister model, Seat Alhambra, which are both seven seater models competing with competitors such as, the Citroen Grand C4 Picasso, Ford Galaxy and Ford S-Max. What makes the Volkswagen Sharan and Seat Alhambra special is that they allow seven adults to sit comfortably in the car, should the occasion arise. Plus, the car boot offers 375 litres of space with all seven seats up, which is enough space for your shopping or, a reasonable size boot with five seats up, or a whopping 2297 litres with just two seats up, making it bigger than some vans space. Here at Hatchbag we have taken both options into account and have created a boot liner with the third-row seats upright & useable, as well as a liner for the third-row seats permanently folded & unusable so that you can choose the perfect protection for your boot’s needs.  So, regardless of whether you need to transport seven 6ft tall adults or want to give the maximum space for your pet pooch, we have the perfect protector for you. All our boot liners come in an array of 7 colours, along with a number of optional extras including, the bumper flap, rear seat flap and boot liner extension, so that you can further customise your liner to suit you and your family’s needs. So, if it’s your Volkswagen Sharan you want to protect then click here. For the Seat Alhambra, click here.  Don’t forget to share your snaps with us. Tweet us your pics @thehatchbagcompany, or Instagram your pics @thehatchbagcompany or send them via Facebook.

Keep your Peugeot 308 SW 2014on boot in tact with a Hatchbag boot-liner

The Peugeot 308 SW is bigger than its sister hatch version, providing more space for passengers, furry friends and luggage alike. With a number of competitors in the estate category, for example, the Volkswagen Golf Estate, Seat Leon ST, Skoda Octavia Estate and Ford Focus Estate, the Peugeot 308 SW does well to boast of one of the biggest boots in the range. So, with all that extra room both in the boot and for passengers, the Peugeot 308 SW is a great all-round family car. There is a total of 660l of space in the boot with the seats upright and once the back seats are folded down then there's a whopping 1775l of space to be utilised. Plus, the back seats fold down completely flat making the space more practical to use. So, with all that space offered, you will want to make sure your boot remains in tip-top condition and a Hatchbag boot protector offers the perfect solution for keeping dirt and grime at bay. And with the extra space with the seats folded flat, why not opt for either a Rear Plus or Rear Split version. The Rear Plus allows you to fold your backseats down altogether, whereas the Rear Split version allows you to fold your backseats down altogether or individually. So go on and customise your boot protector here: https://www.hatchbag.co.uk/peugeot-308-sw-2014-onwards Don’t forget to send us a pic of your Peugeot 308 SW boot liner in action either on Twitter @thehatchbagcompany or on Instagram @thehatchbagcompany or via Facebook.

3 Things Every Car Owner Should Have

Some of us keep absolutely nothing in our car boots, whilst others keep enough packed in their car boots to live comfortably for weeks. Somewhere in between all of this are three things that we believe every car owner should definitely always have to hand.

1. An extra tyre

No one likes the idea of being stranded because they’ve suffered a flat tyre, which is why having a spare in the vehicle at all times is essential. To keep you up and running, it would be wise to store these in your boot:
  • A spare tyre in good condition
  • A small plastic sheet to kneel on
  • A pair of gloves to protect your hands
  • A torch with a spare battery
  • Your registered vehicle handbook
Further advice on how to change a car wheel can be found in this handy AA guide.

2. GPS

Although smartphones can now run a variety of navigation apps, the trusted car GPS should not be viewed as a redundant gadget. Why?
  • Battery life
GPS apps on your smartphone use a large amount of battery power, which means your phone might not even make it all the way through the day if you’re doing numerous trips requiring navigation.
  • Safety
Having to look down or across at your smartphone navigation app can be a very hazardous encounter. Buying a specific mount to place your phone would make things safer, however, with the clamping down on drivers who use their phone whilst driving, it’s better to use the GPs, after all, it is better to be safe than sorry.
  • Data
Smartphone GPS apps use lots of data which can be a major drawback for smartphone users. Dedicated navigation devices don’t tend to have a subscription fee, so you can navigate as much as you need for free.

3. Hatchbag boot-liner

Keeping the boot of your car in pristine condition can be a tough task, and with daily trips somewhat unavoidable, it’s not long before your boot can collect an unwanted amount of grit and dirt. So, why not make this a thing of the past by investing in a Hatchbag boot-liner? The Hatchbag Company creates boot-liners specifically designed to fit more than 520 cars, acting like a second skin within your boot so that no dirt, grit or fur from pets can sneak through any gaps. Made of a tough PVC material that can be easily cleaned, a Hatchbag boot-liner fits perfectly into the corners of your boot and best of all; it can also help to keep your furry friends safe and comfortable while they travel. If this blog post has inspired you to make some changes to your car belongings, we would love to see pictures, especially if they include your pet pooches. Send us your snaps to @HatchbagCompany on Twitter, @thehatchbagcompany on Instagram & The Hatchbag Company on Facebook.

Keep your brand new Renault Kadjar (2015on) boot spotless with a Hatchbag boot protector

The Renault Kadjar (2015on) has a lot in common with the Nissan Qashqai, as well as competing against other small SUVs such as; the Kia Sportage and Skoda Yeti, for which we manufacture tailor-made boot liners for. The French small SUV is brilliant for families, as it is a practical car with low running costs. And, for all those drivers who like to drive in a high riding position then the Renault Kadjar will not disappoint, meaning that not only is the car great for passengers but also for the driver as well. Plus, whether it be packing up the car boot with walking gear, picnic baskets or the family pooch for a day trip outdoors, or, packing the car with suitcases for those family vacations, the Renault Kadjar offers enough space to fulfil your requirements. IMG_0022 The Kadjar offers 472 litres of space in the car boot with the back seats in an upright position and if you want to give your four-legged friend/s more room in the back of the car, or, if you are doing a spring clean and need to make some journeys to the tip then fold your back seats down for 1478 litres of space to be utilised. One thing is for certain, no matter what you use your car boot for you will want to keep it in tip-top condition. So what better way than with a Hatchbag boot liner. All our boot-liners come in a range of seven colours along with a number of optional extras including a bumper flap and tailgate cover, enabling you to customise the perfect protecting solution for your family needs. Don’t forget to send us some photos of your Renault Kadjar boot liner in action, as we just love seeing our products on the road. You can send us your pics via Facebook, Twitter or via Instagram.